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20130129
20130206
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
down, not up. lori: the senate approved a house plan to approve the debt ceiling and hold off on congressional pay if they don't get a budget deal for the next ten years. you say this is more of a risk and even the fiscal cliff was. >> oh, yes. the debt ceiling is a potentially large fiscal contraction like the fiscal cliff was. even bigger, actually, if you do the math. debt ceiling is you cannot borrow, so you have to balance the budget tomorrow. in addition to that, there was the kind of not very real threat that we might default on the national debt or postpone payments, so you're playing with a combination of a big fiscal contraction and the possibility of triggering a financial crisis also. lori: i want to ask you about your book. after the music stopped, but about the financial crisis, to a dozen 7-8. looking back, said always 2020, what were the best actions taken by the federal government and the worst? >> at think there were three. in net you a tie for first? >> you know how tv works. >> one was tart. very unpopular, but effective and turn a profit for the taxpayer.
before. last time in 1995. could it happen? rich edson. we have the fiscal cliff deal. the debt ceiling pushed back and the continuing resolution, right? >> this is because of the debt ceiling in relation to this calendar. the debt ceiling increase is approved in the senate next couple days. that pushes the debt ceiling to may 18th. the back end of number of cliffs upcoming in the calendar. look here at the government deadlines the congress and white house are facing right now. first, march 1st are the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester. they begin to hit the federal budget. that is something that takes place over the course of the year and is gradual. march 27th, that is when government spending runs out. or a large chunk of it. if there is no agreement on that, that could shut down the federal government. you're looking at debt ceiling all the way on may 18th. congressional aides saying treasury is telling them pause of extraordinary measures they can use, this pushes the debt ceiling day back to sometime this summer perhaps if this is a bill that clears congress and the s
, go ahead, we have breaking news. rich: the senate has voted to raise the debt ceiling through may 18. this also has a provision that says in the senate doesn't pass a budget, the senators don't get paid, house lawmakers don't get paid after april 15. they don't get paid until the end of congress and are made whole at the end of the congress in 2014. the bill goes to the president's desk raising the debt ceiling so treasury can extend that sometime to july or august. david: a quick question in terms of defense, we will be talking about how defense cutbacks are hurting individual jobs in individual sectors and does this affect defense spending directly? >> this moves the debt ceiling fight the back. now march 1, automatic spending cuts and defense and other programs begin to hit and government spending on march 27. next up, defense spending will be a topic of conversation in d.c. and congress. david: rich edson, thank you from d.c. liz: the chief strategist in the pits of the cme. right now i would love to sit here and talk about the trading action for today. the last day of january, i
it's not, it is always about "money". melissa: so forget the debt ceiling for a moment. we're just one month away from march 1st. that is the budget sequestration deadline. if congress fails to agree on specifically where to cut $85 billion, we're looking at automatic across-the-board cuts. house republicans made it clear they're ready to let the sequester happen. joining me now for more on this is democratic congressman curt schrader. thanks so much for joining us. what's going to happen? that's what we're all wondering? feels like we're cruising toward this deadline. what is going to happen? >> well, i'm worried, melissa, to be very honest with you. you're right if we don't get our act together do something on tax reform and the social safety net americans count on. we'll have across-the-board cuts. why do it with congress. we could have a bunch of chimpanzees to do this. melissa: don't tempt me. you sort of stopped me dead in my trackses with that one. is something going behind the scenes that we don't know about? doesn't seem like we're not getting closer. at the debt ceiling w
as they do oh, so well, kick the can down the road approving the debt ceiling show down until may. it was a 64-34 vote on the way to president obama who says he will sign it into law allowing uncle sam to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars more to meet obligations. without this legislation, the government would have surpassed its $16.4 trillion debt ceiling next month. just avoided that. more to come this hour including the latest on china hacking into our computers, and more than $7.5 trillion. that's how much money was pumped into this economy in five years. where did it go? did it do any good? i'll break it down, next. ♪ not their short-term agenda. [ male announcer ]oin the nearly 7 million investors who think like you do. face time and think time make a difference. at edward jones, it's how we make sense of investing. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon
happening. >> steve wood, always excellent. ashley: good stuff, sieve. now to the debt ceiling talking about washington. the senate is expected to vote on a temporary measure. rich edson in washington with more on that. rich. >> senators will likely pass the debt ceiling increase this afternoon and the president is expected to sign it extending the debt ceiling through may 18th and paving the way for the next washington fight, spending. >> the republican playbook of continuing complaining about spending is something we know we have to do something with spending. >> there are two things we know about tax increases for sure. first, they reduce jobs and hurt economic growth. and second, they distract us from addressing the real problem which is spending. >> so automatic spending cuts known as the sequester begin in march and a large forges portion of government spending authority runs out on march 27th. if lawmakers fail to reach a spending and budget deal we'll have another government shutdown then. president obama is allowing his jobs council to expire. the 2-year-old council including busine
how quiet things have become about what a huge story we had a month ago? what fiscal cliff? what debt ceiling? it looks like someone in washington is doing a big messaging switcheroo. they don't want us talking about how badly they have mismanaged our nation's finances. instead, let's get people talking about something that is also important, freedom, freedom to bear arms, freedom for people to travel to and from our country. well, the president can pretend he is a big skeet shooter, but it is insulting to think you will notice your paycheck has shrunk as a first of the year. melissa: and be sure to watch the tom sullivan show this weekend at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and on sunday at 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. eastern. what do you think of the market? 14,000, up next week, the dow? >> we are rich. okay. i think it will bring people into the market. probably good. chase the market up as the money comes in. melissa: absolutely. all right. have a great weekend everybody. we'll see you back here monday. ♪ w w w w w w w w w w w w w w we cavuto show. >> super bowl weekend. you going
. they just put off the debt ceiling problems down the road. sequestration still happening on march 1, that hasn't gone anywhere, yet this study says 57% of small business owners expect the financial situation to be buried to so much good. both are the same number of jobs at their company makes your year overall as there were last year was to me is very optimistic. but they just happen to not be firing anyone. if that optimism? >> what is happening, you technically feel better, but you still have eye problems. optimism is not here. a look at the projections and say we can make this happen. we're reminded we have to keep for a few weeks longer. melissa: you have to have a lot of courage, and perhaps things have been tough for so long it is kind of the new normal, the new year, maybe they are marginally better or a lot better, i don't know. am i getting anywhere? >> you're right, have to be optimistic optimism. melissa: talking to one of the fundamental problems which is people being overeducated for the job they have. almost everybody has a bachelor's degree of some type, you can get t
and we have a previous conversation with how we are going to fund the government and the debt ceiling crisis. we are looking at a long set of crisis here and trying to figure out how we will fund the government again beginning at the end of march. the sequester that supposed to go into effect. all of the administration is talking about how can we spend more money. what we saw is that it gave proof that our economy is depending too much on government spending. that our economy is living on borrowed time. also borrowed money. it feels like we have been drinking coffee in order to stay up all night. we know that is not sustainable. it is not sustainable for us to continue to borrow at this rate. we will start to see our economy contract if we don't get things under control. we have to address the fiscal matters anyway to cut spending. otherwise it is going to be even worse. charles: you started to talk about this. it feels like the economy ultimately has a price to pay. >> home ownership levels are dropping in this country. rentals are up. people are choosing not to own a home home anymo
. i think they will do the same thing on the upcoming debt ceiling and sequestration. ashley: so if we do have this pullback after the state of the union, jeff, what sectors or stocks in particular do you like? >> i actually like all the sectors except the consumer staples. a lot of portfolio managers, professional money has been hiding out in the consumer staples because they were worried about the upcoming election, the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, china slowing, you name it, dysfunctional government. now it has become more apparent our dysfunctional government has become a little bit less dysfunctional i think investors will start to have to look at the fundamentals. i think the fundamentals with the housing situation, the automobile strength i think it is going to come to the fore. tracy: i hope you're right, jeff saut, with raymond james. thank you very much, sir. >> you bet. ashley: jeff says when housing is healthy and automobile industry is healthy that's always a good sign for a solid recovery. tracy: he is not wrong, right? they do kumbaya at the last minute. ashley: good
. the president to so confidently told congress last month that he would refuse to negotiate on the debt ceiling is now looking for that same congress to bail him out. president obama desperate for help with the trillion dollars sequester that was the bright idea of the white house. the president today made his plea for help in deferring the onset of the sequestered for another few months. it sounds a lot more like an order for more of the same short term, small minded fakes that has become the way washington of late. >> this congress cannot act immediately on a bigger package. if they cannot get a bigger package done by that time the sequester is scheduled fox business to affect then i believe they should at least passed a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of a sequester for fear -- few more months. lou: headed in the right direction icaria statement considering that it contracted the last quarter, and as he is fond of doing, insisted that republicans give him something for the privilege of doing his bidding. he wants more revenu
of what has given us so far and to an all-time high? we postpone the debt ceiling program, we get decent earnings, fundamentals here and abroad are reasonably good, central banks everywhere giving us all the help in the world and still returning zero and getting tired of that. liz: let's bring that up, can return zero. it may as well be almost treasuries which are just a 2% for the ten year. 46% of the s&p company's reporting so far for numbers, 69%, are you comfortable with that number? >> it is staying, no question. anything close to 70 is really good and on the revenue line, they have been above expectations as well. liz: if someone is positive with bob dole, i was into the market and i'm going to start picking, what the you look for when you are picking stock? >> you need to say i am a dollar cost average because i am not smart enough to get the lows and pick some of. money earmarked for equities. liz: every paycheck auto debt that goes into what? >> companies with free cash flow you can find mutual funds that focus on that sort of thing or secure own companies will do that and in a
-being. the debt ceiling has been pushed off till may. now we're in the cadence of the budget that will come forward and immigration reform is the signature item of the president, of the business community and both parties. so there is a realp opportunity to do this. david: let me just ask about one specific thing. a lot of people are on board with regard to immigrants who can add to the economy. we just had an immigrant from india on earlier who came here, got an education, at mit. and went on to start a company that makes a billion dollars and employs a thousand people that kind of immigrant is the nation that is okay with. it is the immigrants to suck off the government, to take more than they give that they're against. do you think everybody is on board with that idea? >> i think there is a lot of misinformation. i don't agree with that characterization. people have to tendency to talk about the founder, the stanford grad or mit grad that knows computer science and pounds a company and that's great. that is the h-1b high-skilled worker. equally important is the 11 million undocumented. s
up through april is the debt ceiling and what congress is going to do about that. and particularly, one number that was interesting this week was personal income and spending. it was a great number, but when you look forward, my concern is the new tax policies that are in place. and that amount of money may not be in consumers' pockets going forward. so it's been a great rally here in january. but i look for a pullback and i think we could see a 5% pullback when you look at interest rates hovering around 200 basis points, can't really pop any higher than that from a yield standpoint. i agree a correction is in the air and it is something we have to take a little pause, see where we're at and where we may go going forward. liz: yeah, i mean, we can't ignore the fact -- i want to check it because it changes moment by moment -- but the vix just at 13, straddling there? i mean alan you are looking at an energy and commodities picture over there. but when there is very little fear, and rising stocks, rising commodities, and a falling volatility index that just looks -- i mean we're show
bill. connell: we have rich edson on capitol hill. rich: the senate is increasing a debt in the ceiling. that would allow spending through may 18. they can push that date even further into the summer. the debt ceiling moves out of the way for fight over government spending. it has already started. >> clearly, it is the spending that we have to deal. now is the perfect time to do so. the key to a robust recovery is to create jobs and grow. >> it is something that we know. we understand that. there is more to making our recall of an economy. rich: if any of the amendments pass, the bill then heads back to the house. the senate will very likely said this bill to the president's desk this evening. the sequester beginning in march in a large portion of government authority running out march 7. if they fail to reach a spending puma we will have another government shutdown. back to you. connell: let's bring in band manager. -- let's bring in dan and. the president is a bully. is that what that means? >> clearly, john boehner is now understanding that what is going on is he is in the thunder do
had earmarked for the equity market. we have avoided the fiscal cliff posted on the debt ceiling. earnings are decent, decent economic indicators here and outside the u.s. on balance is good, not everyone of them. we have central bankers all over the world, but begging for reflation putting money in the system and a lot of cash getting zero return and those things i think are the reason the stock is likely to continue going. connell: that is the last one i want to pick up on because reading your most recent numbers is lack of tolerance for the cash balances giving a zero return, so people do look and say i can't get a return for a decent yield on anything, so i would rather be in stocks than any kind of fixed income class. if any of that changing in the future, and if so at what point? interest rates have to go up some point, don't they? >> i think they will continue to creep higher, but they can't go a lot higher because the economy would then weekend. so i think as we globalize and the rate race will continue hig, but a lot of cash out there saying when things were volatile in
, a strong first half of the year, and something happened, usually out of washington, s&p downgrade, debt ceiling debate, take the pick, and we fell off the cliff. do you see that happening this year? >> after the election in germany this fall, yes, i expect things will be bad in the world economy. cheryl: you mentioned europe four times now. >> yeah, i mean, there's going to be a lot of good news, and she's got one of the largest economies in the world. her central bank in europe is printing money as well now. everybody's printing money. cheryl, it can't go on. it's artificial. it's a pool of par dies. if it's based on printing presses, that's a bad theme. cheryl: the lost decade. gym -- jim rogers, thank you very much. congratulations on the book. >> thank youings thank you, make that two lost decades. cheryl: that's right, thank you. dennis: the dow is now at 13999, but they will be right some day. all right, looks like the housing recovery could be for real. december home prices making the highest leap in six and a half years, this as a third of listings in some markets, washington, d
they a debt ceiling in may, sequester coming up anytime soon now. on the flipside though you are even suggesting will be some m&a activity going on this coming year. of course housing is looking really good. >> yeah. certainly there are a lot of key things working for the economy right now. housing one of them. certainly manufacturing. starting to really move and of course, you know the cheap energy that we enjoy. putting that all together we're certainly, you know, trying to head into what would be a, you know, a first year of an austerity year, right? we are going it see some government cutbacks with many so what of a running head start. so i think that is good news. like i said, we've seen some tax increases. i would like to see spending reports as a result of these new taxes. tracy: right. >> in place. we'll have to see how that works out. and of course then sequestration which, you know, paul ryan and other republicans are braced for going ahead and tripping over it. so that could amount to roughly a 3% cut in government spending. tracy: jack, actually i've been hearing more and
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)